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Is experience overrated in a knowledge age?

An interesting view on the education industry and how it should be taking best practices from the business world to attract and retain talented staff. …

In my experience, the education sector can only benefit from the innovations and ideas from other sectors and industries.  I think we should be examining the underlying philosophies, principles and practices that make an organisation successful in a knowledge age and how schools can learn from or even adopt similar practices.  Yet there is still a reticence to do anything that has been cultivated from without the education sector.

Everything is evolving in a connected world and it seems the game-changers are companies like Amazon and Google including how they employ and retain creative staff.  It seems that potential is more valuable than experience in the 21st century according to article in the latest Harvard Business Review.

The article’s author, Claudio Fernandez-Araoz says believes we are moving into a new era of talent spotting, in which ‘potential’ is the ‘most important predictor of success at all levels.’  Fernandez-Araoz says that the…

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School Places looks to disrupt private education

Having just received a $2 million investment, School Places, an online marketplace connecting vacancies in private schools with potential families, is looking to expand it’s footprint into the NSW market. The company has started strongly in Victoria, with numerous partner schools on board, who provide a discount on school fees, ranging from 10-30% for last minute placements that become available. It’s a win win for parents, who can register for alerts to be notified when places become available, and for schools who can fill all potential placements.

You can read the full article at Start Up Smart : Innovation – School Places looks to disrupt private education with a $2 million investment.

Students want learning “on demand”

An interesting article from The Wall Street Journey which looks at a recent study of over 20,000 university students across the globe. The study shows that students want more flexibility in how they learn, and more time to complete their skills over time. Are Universities ready to change to meet  student’s needs, or will the appetite for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) increase as they cater for an “on demand” style of learning?

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Read the full article here:

The End of College As We Know It And Students Feel Fine – At Work – WSJ.

What is the purpose of K-12 schooling?

The answer to this question may be very different for students, parents, teachers, schools, and governments. Is it to learn life skills, to make social connections, or to prepare children for college / university? Everyone has their own opinion on the relevance of learning – which is why it’s so hard for educators to meet everyone’s expectations and needs.

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The article below from Connected Principals sheds some interesting thoughts and resources on this topic …

Making Learning Relevant | Connected Principals.

Fees and higher education: does social class make a difference?

An interesting article from The Conversation, written by Andrew Norton, Program Director – Higher Education, at Grattan Institute. The article looks at statistics to show that it is most often the lower ranking ATAR students (which doesn’t necessarily have a skew to lower socio-economic background) that attend university, which have the highest non-completion rate, and may have been better served by being informed about other options such as vocational training or entering the workforce. It goes on to argue that fee deregulation may not have such a big impact on lower socio-ecomonic students. Take a read below – do you agree?

Students

In contemporary Australia, post-school education is necessary for most well-paid jobs. And so who gets access to education is important. University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor Glyn Davis echoed many people’s concerns when he asked whether university fee deregulation will deter potential students from low socioeconomic status backgrounds. However, if we look at the evidence, we see this isn’t necessarily the case.

Is university for everyone?

Important as this issue is, another question needs answering first: is higher education everyone’s best option? While on average people with higher education qualifications are better off than others, some students never complete the courses they start, and not all graduates get good jobs. Even free university courses can cost too much, if students could have used their time more effectively.

Once students are enrolled, low socioeconomic status does not in itself add significantly to non-completion risks or poor financial returns after graduation. But low socioeconomic background students are over-represented among school leavers applying with lower ATARs, and lower-ATAR university students are in turn over-represented among those who don’t complete their courses.

For students entering a bachelor degree with an ATAR under 60, six-year completion chances are around 50%, compared to nearly 90% for students in the 95-plus ATAR group. All the published completions data includes people who are still enrolled, but for lower-ATAR students the final non-completion rate is estimated to be around 40%. It isn’t social progress to leave someone with a student debt but no degree, if with better advice they would have made a different educational decision.

In contemporary Australia, post-school education is necessary for most well-paid jobs. And so who gets access to education is important. University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor Glyn Davis echoed many people’s concerns when he asked whether university fee deregulation will deter potential students from low socioeconomic status backgrounds. However, if we look at the evidence, we see this isn’t necessarily the case.Is university for everyone? Important as this issue is, another question needs answering first: is higher education everyone’s best option? While on average people with higher education qualifications are better off than others, some students never complete the courses they start, and not all graduates get good jobs. Even free university courses can cost too much, if students could have used their time more effectively.Once students are enrolled, low socioeconomic status does not in itself add significantly to non-completion risks or poor financial returns after graduation. But low socioeconomic background students are over-represented among school leavers applying with lower ATARs, and lower-ATAR university students are in turn over-represented among those who don’t complete their courses.For students entering a bachelor degree with an ATAR under 60, six-year completion chances are around 50%, compared to nearly 90% for students in the 95-plus ATAR group. All the published completions data includes people who are still enrolled, but for lower-ATAR students the final non-completion rate is estimated to be around 40%. It isn’t social progress to leave someone with a student debt but no degree, if with better advice they would have made a different educational decision.

Continue reading the full article here: Fees and higher education: does social class make a difference?.